Wednesday, 6 March 2019

EU Demands Money Laundering Convictions

Note: Broadcast journalist Deandrè Williamson represented The Bahamas Press Club 2014 at the 7th World Conference Against Death Penalty, which was held in Brussels from February 26 to March 1st, 2019. Miss Williamson is a former ZNS news reporter, and a former editor and reporter at  JCN. See below, her report from the historic Conference:



EU Demands Money Laundering Convictions
The Bahamas ‘Stubborn’ with Global Financial Obligations

Deandre Williamson
Journal Staff Writer


BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – European Union Member of Parliament Sven Giegold called The Bahamas a “stubborn case” as he insisted that the country must carry out money laundering convictions before the nation can be considered for removal from the European Union’s blacklist.

“According to the figures I have, there are no convictions on The Bahamas because of money laundering,” Giegold, who was in Germany, said during an exclusive Skype interview with The Bahama Journal in Brussels, Belgium.

Last month, The Bahamas was blacklisted by the European Union and labeled as a high risk jurisdiction for financial crime.  However, the EU wants action from The Bahamas, which includes enforcing the financial services laws.

According to Giegold, all large financial sectors, like The Bahamas, have money laundering problems and there are globally agreed standards which are violated by fraudsters and people who have money to hide.

“If in certain jurisdictions, although it has a larger financial place, a larger financial center, and nobody is convicted, that is a clear sign that your regime doesn’t deliver,” Giegold said.  “That is the reason why The Bahamas was seen as a country that has not solved all the problems and this is not about destroying anyone’s business.”

Giegold, who is also the coordinator on the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee for European Parliament’s Greens Group, pointed out that The Bahamas’ position in the international debate was that the government would fight crime, not money laundering.

 “The position of your government was we will fight drug dealers, we will fight corruption, we will fight trafficking humans and so on, but we will not go after money laundering,” Giegold said, adding that “this is why there is a basically zero positive track record in The Bahamas.”
“This is exactly what is a very unfortunate position because fighting the money coming from crime is one of the most promising levers to fight crime.  So it is not enough to say we fight the original criminality.  We also have to try best to fight dirty money, so that the incentive to do crime is reduced because if you cannot use the money you make with crime, you’ll be less inclined to become criminal. 
“This is the reason why there is this global standard and The Bahamas have to show that you are cleaning up your financial sector and convict the fraudsters and close the accounts of those who have dubious track records of where they got the money from.”

The EU’s decision to blacklist The Bahamas was based on an evaluation by the Financial Action Task Force and an additional evaluation by the EU. 

An analysis was made which indicates that The Bahamas has a number of deficiencies in areas such as criminalization and convictions, customer due diligence in the financial sector, customer due diligence in the nonfinancial sector, powers of competent authorities, sanctions, international cooperation, beneficial ownership information, and targeted financial sanctions.

“The Bahamas is a particular stubborn case and that is the result of the evaluation that has been done,” Giegold said.
Earlier this year, Prime Minister Dr. Hubert Minnis and Attorney General Carl Bethel met with members of the European Union in Brussels, Belgium about the country’s involvement in international financial markets. 

According to Giegold, solving the issues behind the analysis is more important than Bahamian politicians visiting Europe for meetings.  

 “For this, we don’t need meetings in Europe,” he said.  “We want to see convictions and effective cooperation.”
Following the EU’s decision to blacklist The Bahamas, Bethel told the Senate that the government has addressed the concerns of the EU which involves the criminalization of money laundering and terrorist financing by implementing the Proceeds of Crime Act (since 1996) and the Anti-Terrorism Act 2018.

Also, Bethel said the customer due diligence and record keeping requirements were addressed in the Financial Transactions Reporting Act 2018, and its predecessor law with the same name, since 2000.

But according to Giegold, passing laws isn’t sufficient, and he explained that The Bahamas must also demonstrate to the public and global community that laws are not only passed, but applied rigorously.

“This means people who have broken rules such as due diligence, have opened offshore companies for criminal people, that they have to come to justice and the respective financial institutions lose their licenses.  There must be real consequences of these laws and then you are credible,” he said, adding that there are also other measures that must be taken before The Bahamas is clean.

Giegold, who is also an economist with specialization in financial crimes, hopes The Bahamas would work cooperatively with the EU because the EU has no intentions of destroying the country’s financial services sector.  He said the EU just wants The Bahamas to conduct business in accordance with globally agreed rules.

“Our subject is that you are a part of a global financial system, an important financial center, and at the same time do not respect the rules which go with open capital accounts.  That is the basis,” he said.” Our cup of tea is, there are global rules and they have to be enforced regardless who is in government.”


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For further information contact: Secretary Lindsay Thompson at (242) 434-5643. Email:thebahamaspressclub@gmail.com.
Website: www.bahamaspressclub.org

Sven Giegold, Member of European Parliament


Sunday, 3 March 2019

ECPM Urges Bahamian Govt to Abolish Death Penalty


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 3, 2019

Note: Broadcast journalist Deandrè Williamson represented The Bahamas Press Club 2014 at the 7th World Conference Against Death Penalty, which was held in Brussels from February 26 to March 1st, 2019. Miss Williamson is a former ZNS news reporter, and a reporter at JCN. See below, her report from the historic Conference:


ECPM Urges Bahamian Govt to Abolish Death Penalty
‘Fake Solidarity Hinders Caribbean on Death Penalty Abolition’

Deandre Williamson
Journal Staff Writer

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – Together Against the Death Penalty (ECPM) Executive Director Raphael Chenuil-Hazan urged the Bahamian government abolish the death penalty and break away from what he calls the “fake solidarity” that seems to be preventing The Bahamas and other English-speaking Caribbean countries from becoming abolitionist states.

Chenuil-Hazan made this plea to the government during an interview with The Bahama Journal at the 7th World Congress Against the Death Penalty in Brussels, Belgium where he expressed concerns over The Bahamas keeping the death penalty as law and not using it.  

Other English-speaking Caribbean countries do the same and Chenuil-Hazan considers this practice as a bad example.

“It’s kind of shaming and I don’t like shaming,” he said. “But it’s a reality of original solidarity.  I think that some countries in the Caribbean should stop this fake regional solidarity.”

ECPM is a French nongovernmental organization with a mission to abolish the death penalty worldwide.

Although The Bahamas is identified by Amnesty International as one of the 52 retentionist states around the world where the death penalty is implemented, The Bahamas has a de facto moratorium on the death penalty. 

The last execution took place in The Bahamas in 2000 when Bahamian national David Mitchell was hanged after being convicted for the murders of two German tourists.  Mitchell had an appeal pending before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights at the time of his execution.

However, the imposition of the death penalty in The Bahamas is no longer mandatory following a Judicial Committee of the Privy Council’s decision in a case, which ruled that judges can exercise discretion and should sentence only “the worst of the worst” and the “rarest of the rare” to death.

According to Chenuil-Hazan, breaking away from the “fake solidarity” would lead The Bahamas to a formal moratorium on the death penalty. 

He suggested that The Bahamas embrace the United Nations General Assembly Moratorium Resolution and not continuously follow other Caribbean countries by voting against it.

“The Bahamas should vote,” Chenuil-Hazan said.  “It’s normal.  It’s logical.  Dominica should vote in favour, but they don’t just because of this strange solidarity.  You should go beyond and have your own identity based on your own situation.”
In a report released by the Advocates for Human Rights, The Greater Caribbean for Life, and The World Coalition against the Death Penalty, The Bahamas has voted against every United Nations General Assembly Moratorium Resolution and up until 2012, The Bahamas also signed the Note Verbale of Dissociation from the resolution each year.

If The Bahamas receives a formal moratorium on the death penalty, the country would be globally recognized as a state with a moratorium on executions. 

Amnesty International identifies countries with formal moratoriums as states or territories where the death penalty is implemented, but no executions have been carried out for at least 10 years and which did not oppose the latest United Nations Resolution for a universal moratorium on executions.

In addition, Chenuil-Hazan also suggested that the government should begin to shape the public’s opinion so that Bahamians who are in favour of the death penalty would understand that the death penalty is not a deterrent to crime.

Using China as an example, Chenuil-Hazan explained that thousands of Chinese are executed each year, but there is no decrease in China’s crime rate.

“So when you execute hundreds and thousands of people every year, you take the risk of becoming a dictatorship and break the rule of law,” he explained.  “Do you want to be in a democracy with rule of law or in a dictatorship with hundreds and hundreds of killings?”

The ECPM director added that the government should have a strong willingness to educate Bahamians so that public opinion would change and Bahamians would understand that ending the death penalty is a part of entering a new world that has been embraced by countries in South America, Europe and Africa.

While abolishing the death penalty may be complicated for some to understand, applying it increases crime, according to Chenuil-Hazan.

“Applying the death penalty would bring violence, state violence,” Chenuil-Hazan said.  “The death penalty is a violence, when you kill someone.  It is a violence and it is a symbolic state violence.”

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For further information contact: Secretary Lindsay Thompson at (242) 434-5643. Email:thebahamaspressclub@gmail.com.
Website: www.bahamaspressclub.org


Bahamas Press Club Member, broadcast journalist Deandrè Williamson attended the 7th World Conference Against Death Penalty, in Brussels from February 26 to March 1st, 2019. She is pictured at the European Parliament interviewing ECPM Executive Director, Raphael Chenuil-Hazan.



Wednesday, 27 February 2019

Press Club Member Attends 7th World Congress Against the Death Penalty


February 27, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Bahamian broadcast journalist Deandre Williamson is representing The Bahamas Press Club 2014, at the 7th World Conference Against Death Penalty, in Brussels from February 26 to March 1st, 2019. She is pictured at the European Parliament.


Press Club Member attends World Congress Against the Death Penalty in Brussels

NASSAU, The Bahamas – The Bahamas Press Club 2014 is pleased to announced that one of its members, broadcast journalist Deandre Williamson will be among media professionals at the 7th World Conference Against Death Penalty, which will be held in Brussels from February 26 to March 1st, 2019.

Miss Williamson is a former ZNS news reporter, and a former editor and reporter for The Bahama Journal newspaper/JCN. And according to Press Club President Anthony Capron, her presence at the Conference means a proud moment for the organization and the country.

"We in The Bahamas Press Club 2014 are extremely proud of our member Deandre Williamson who is currently in Brussels attending the 7th World Congress Against the Death Penalty,” Mr. Capron reaffirmed.

“With the wide views that will undoubtedly emanate from this universal coalition, Deandrè should be better equipped and prepared to deal with the pros and cons in any discussion about the death penalty."

The Bahamas Press Club was invited to send representation to the Conference because it is a charter member of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Press Clubs Federation (ACP-PCF), founded in October 2016 in Kigali, Rwanda. The Bahamas Press Club was represented by then President Anthony Newbold, who was appointed Vice President and a member of the Executive Council of the newly-formed African Caribbean & Pacific Press Clubs Federation.
The coordination and support of the ACP-PCF activities is presently based in Brussels.

The ACP-PCF aims to establish a network of national press clubs or press centres, working in collaboration to strengthen the viability and professionalism of media bodies in ACP regions, and to foster intra-ACP communication, cooperation, and networking with similar international bodies around the world. PACP-PCF’s also seeks to create greater awareness of the basic features of the ACP-EU Partnership and build links between ACP and EU countries to facilitate and encourage the exchange of expertise and experience; and raising public awareness of key development issues, including post-Cotonou relations.

The Official Opening Ceremony of the 7th World Congress Against the Death Penalty was held in the European Parliament in Brussels on 27 February.

The event organized by the Ensemble Contre La Peine De Mort - Together Against the Death Penalty, which is the world’s leading abolitionist affair and is expected to bring together many stakeholders from over 140 countries.
Miss Williamson will be able to report on the dialogues and discussions emanating from the sessions, and expand her knowledge about the abolition of the death penalty in various countries.
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For further information contact: Secretary Lindsay Thompson at (242) 434-5643. Email:thebahamaspressclub@gmail.com.
Website: www.bahamaspressclub.org

Monday, 25 February 2019

BPC Meets Marguerite Sullivan


February 25, 2019


Bahamas Press Club and US Embassy held dialogue with Veteran Communication Specialist Marguerite Sullivan


NASSAU, The Bahamas – The Bahamas Press Club 2014 was invited by the United States Embassy in Nassau to participate in a virtual dialogue with veteran communications specialist Marguerite Sullivan, former president of the Washington Press Club, now the National Press Club.

The dialogue held Friday, March 22, 2019 at the US Embassy on Queen Street, was part of the embassy public affairs section’s speakers series. Bahamas Press Club Members present were: Anthony Capron, President; Anthony Newbold, Immediate Past President; Lindsay Thompson, Secretary; Vincent Vaughan, Treasurer; and Deandre Williamson, Member; Morgan Adderley, reporter, The Tribune; Penny Rechkemmer, Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Embassy, Nassau and Lisa Moxey, Media Specialist, US Embassy, Nassau.

Bahamas Press Club president Anthony Capron expressed his gratitude to the Embassy for the invitation and said that the organization is looking forward to a continued partnership towards media relations.

"On behalf of The Bahamas Press Club, I heartily thank the US Embassy for arranging and facilitating the virtual conversation with Marguerite Sullivan,” Mr. Capron said.

“Ms Sullivan's breadth and scope of experience in journalism and in the leadership of the National Press Club in Washington, DC, can be of a beneficial resource to The Bahamas Press Club, and we will certainly take advantage of that."

Ms Sullivan, who serves as the senior director of the Centre on International Media Assistance, a think tank on international media and good governance issues, talked about the nuances of running such organizations, offered suggestions on growing press club membership and prominence, and the struggles the club’s American counterpart has faced.

She noted the National Press Club is a “multi-faceted” organization, with its core tenets including freedom of the press, opportunities to cover newsmakers, social events, and providing support.  And, that the organization shies away from lobbying but seeks to educate and spread awareness about matters of national and international concern.

Ms Sullivan also pointed out that the National Press Club is “very aggressive” regarding issues tackling freedom of speech and defending the rights of journalists’ world over.

In October 2018, The Bahamas Press Club issued a statement; calling out Deputy Prime Minister Peter Turnquest for his criticism of a local journalist from the floor of Parliament, saying the time is “long past” for journalists to be dictated to by politicians in power.

The virtual dialogue held at the US Embassy on February 22, is the first on the list of plans and activities the Press Club will engage in, during the year culminating with its Fifth Annual Media Awards in November.

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Morgan Adderley, Reporter, The Tribune contributed to this press release.
For further information contact: Secretary Lindsay Thompson at (242) 434-5643. Email:thebahamaspressclub@gmail.com.
Website: www.bahamaspressclub.org



The United States Embassy in Nassau invited The Bahamas Press Club 2014 to engage in a dialogue with communication specialist Marguerite Sullivan as a part of its Public Affairs Section’s Speaker Series. Ms Sullivan is a former president of the Washington Press Club, now the National Press Club. The session was held on Friday, February 22, 2019 between 10:30am - 11:30am at the U.S. Embassy, Queen Street. Pictured from left are: Anthony Newbold, Immediate Past President; Deandre Williamson, member; Anthony Capron, President; Penny Rechkemmer, Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Embassy Nassau; Lindsay Thompson, Secretary, Bahamas Press Club; and Vincent Vaughan, Treasurer, Bahamas Press Club.
(PHOTO/US Embassy)




The United States Embassy in Nassau invited The Bahamas Press Club 2014 to engage in a dialogue with communication specialist Marguerite Sullivan as a part of its Public Affairs Section’s Speaker Series. Ms Sullivan is a former president of the Washington Press Club, now the National Press Club. The session was held on Friday, February 22, 2019 between 10:30am - 11:30am at the U.S. Embassy, Queen Street. On screen via Skpye is Ms Sullivan. Present were: Anthony Newbold, Immediate Past President; Deandre Williamson, member; Anthony Capron, President; Penny Rechkemmer, Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Embassy Nassau; Lindsay Thompson, Secretary, Bahamas Press Club; Vincent Vaughan, Treasurer, Bahamas Press Club; and Morgan Adderley, Reporter, The Tribune.
(PHOTO/US Embassy)



Monday, 12 November 2018

Press Club Honours Best in Media



2018 Bahamas Press Club Honourees 

November 12, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Club honoured best in media in awards ceremony

NASSAU, The Bahamas - It was a black tie event of grand glamour on November 10th, as various members of Bahamian media gathered at the British Colonial Hilton, for the annual Bahamas Press Club Media Awards, honouring many among them for their journalistic achievements throughout the year.

This years theme, “Celebrating 45 years of Independence,” captured nominees and categories from all genres. Additionally, eight distinguished Journalists were honored for their role in capturing the Independence story of 1973. Among those honored was President of The Bahamas Press Club 2014, Mr. Anthony Capron, for his work with a publication called, “The People”.

Capron said the while everyone may have a different story as it relates to the Independence events of 1973, he said the Press Club does not intend to let the events of our recent history pass unnoticed into oblivion.

“Gladstone Thurston would have a different memory, Mike Lothian’s story would not be the same. And, I’m certain, Ed Bethel would have a completely different take, as would everyone else who was at that memorable time in modern history of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,” said Capron.

Other Independence honorees were: Mike Lothian, The Tribune; Fred Sturrup, The Nassau Guardian; Gladstone Thurston, The Tribune; Vincent Vaughn, Freelance Photographer; Ed Bethel, ZNS; Oswald Brown, The Torch and Eileen Carron, The Tribune.

Nothing surprised guests and attendees more than the People’s Choice Award winner for Best Radio Show and Best Radio Talk Show, Rodney Moncur of Freedom March. Additionally, The Bahamas Press Club Person of the Year was also revealed as Mrs. Shaune Miller Uibo, for her outstanding athletic achievements in track and field for The Bahamas.

However, the big winner of the night was the EyeWitness News team. Just six months old, they have proven themselves to be on their way to becoming a media powerhouse, taking home several awards including the category of Best Newscast.

Clint Watson, News Director at Eyewitness News, said it has been a powerful six months for the new team.

“Tonight is a testament of how hard we’ve worked,” said Watson. “We are coming from nobody knowing us to rising to the top of the scene. I have a wonderful committed team of the most passionate young people who work together to make it all happen-this is an example of teamwork,” Watson said.

Pioneer Award recipient Ivan Johnson, Publisher of The Punch, said he finds much more honour in being honoured by his peers. “It’s so much more meaningful, said Johnson. “They actually know and appreciate what you did, so the fact that they honored me and gave me this award really means alot-much more than from people who are outside the business,” said Johnson.

For those new to the profession, Johnson said they should always hold the politians feet to the fire.

“Don’t let them intimidate you as a reporter-give them hell,” said Johnson.

The top Honour for the night - The Etienne Dupuch Lifetime Achievement Award - went to Sir Charles Carter, former broadcast journalist at ZNS, politican and the owner of Carter Marketing and Island FM radio station. Mark Carter, his son and grandson Cayman Carter accepted the award on behalf of the father and grandfather.

“He would have loved to have been here because what you are doing is what he started. Creating the future of The Bahamas and telling the Bahaman story and it’s up to you people in this room to continue telling those Bahamian stories,” Said Carter.

Also receiving awards were:

The Bahamas Press Club Student Media Journalism Award                   
WINNER: Laurencia Smith, Media Journalism Student, UB

 The Leon Turnquest Award for Sports Print Journalism          
WINNER: Sheldon Longley, The Nassau Guardian

The Phil Smith Award for Outstanding Sports Broadcast Journalism
WINNER: Randy Smith, Eyewitness News

The Bursell Bradshaw Press Photographer of the Year Award                   
WINNER: Torrell Glinton, The Nassau Guardian

The Kenneth Nathaniel Francis Award for Newspaper Design
WINNER: Ayhisha Small-Cleare, The Nassau Guardian

The P. Anthony White Award for Columnist of The Year          
WINNER: Inigo “Naughty” Zenicazelaya, The Tribune

The Leslie Higgs Feature Writer of The Year Award                 
WINNER: Cara Hunt, The Tribune

The Cyril Stevenson Award for Outstanding Political Journalism                   
WINNER: Vaughnique Toote, Our News

The Award for Best Television Documentary                              
WINNER: Andrew Burrows, The Ministry of Agriculture & Marine Resources

The Award for Best Television News Story
WINNER: Theo Sealy, Eyewitness News

The Award for Best Editing for Television News Story or Documentary
WINNER: Terran Knowles, Our News

Social Media Award
WINNER: Hadassah Deleveaux, Public Relations Manager, BTVI

Best Cinematography Award (Documentary)                  
WINNER: Eyewitness News

Best Video Editing Award              
WINNER: Agatha Christie, Eyewitness News

Best Producer Award (Packaged)              
WINNERS: Apryl Sands & Shamiko Gilbert, Eyewitness News

The PAHO/WHO Excellence in Health Promotion Award                           
HONOURABLE MENTION – Felicity Ingraham, Freelance Journalist

Best Television News Story
HONOURABLE MENTION– Kyle Walkine, Our News


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Contact
To learn more, please contact:
Lindsay Thompson
Secretary
242-434-5643
For more about the Bahamas Press Club 2014, visit www.bahamaspressclub.org
Facebook: The Bahamas Press Club 2014

Sunday, 4 November 2018

Ivan Johnson to Receive Pioneer Award


   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
  
    November 4, 2018

Punch Publisher Ivan Johnson to receive Pioneer Award at Press Club Media Awards Ceremony

NASSAU, The Bahamas – The Bahamas Press Club announces that Publisher of The Punch, Ivan Nicholas Johnson is this year’s recipient of The Pioneer Award for newspaper publication.
Said to be provocative and controversial but eminently successful, Johnson is the only Bahamian to have worked as a Star sub-editor and journalist at newspapers on Fleet Street, London. 

Johnson is founder and editor of The Punch, a controversial Bahamian tabloid newspaper, which also offers other genre of media including hard news, politics, religion, commentary, features, Government notices and private advertising.

Johnson will receive the honour on Saturday, November 10, 2018 at the British Colonial Hilton, in a Black Tie, Red Carpet event. Other members of the media will be recognized for their work in various capacities.
Again, Her Excellency the Most Hon Dame Marguerite Pindling, Governor General of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, will serve as Patron.

This year’s theme is: “Celebrating 45 Years of Bahamian Media 1973-2018”, and Title Sponsor is IL Cares Foundation and Verizon Media Group. Other major sponsors are Aliv, Sunshine Holdings Ltd. Royal Fidelity, ZNS, The Nassau Guardian, The Tribune, The Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and many other supporters of Bahamian media.

Ivan Nicholas Johnson was born on June 27, 1953 in Nassau, The Bahamas. He was educated at Queen’s College in Nassau, Bahamas and at the Seaford Court Preparatory School at Malvern Link, Worcestershire. His high school education was completed at Malvern College where he took O and, A levels in English literature and Spanish. He later studied Spanish during a summer break at the University of Valladolid.

This journalist is also a former professional, all rounder, English first-class cricketer, who played for Worcestershire County Cricket Club from 1972 to 1975.  From 1972, during the English county cricket offseason winter months; Johnson was employed as a trainee reporter at The Tribune newspaper in Nassau.

In October 1975, Johnson became a trainee journalist with Thomson Newspapers, owned by Lord Thomson of Fleet. He worked at the Hemel Hempstead Evening Post-Echo and studied at the Harlow College of Journalism in Essex. This training was followed by one year's cadetship at Reuters.

Johnson returned to Nassau in 1976. At The Tribune, two chief reporters had quit without warning. Johnson agreed to act as the newspaper's chief reporter up to the 1977 general election.

In October 1976, Johnson clashed with the Progressive Liberal Party leader, Prime Minister Lynden Pindling during the ZNS-TV radio programme, Contact. Contact was a monthly, live broadcast where Sir Lynden was questioned by journalists. Sir Lynden became angry when answering Johnson's questions. In November 1976, Sir Lynden refused to appear with Johnson. Johnson continued to goad Sir Lynden in The Tribune. After the 1977 election, Johnson returned to England and in 1979, he gained employment at The London Sun newspaper as a staff sub-editor.

In 1985, Johnson was seconded to Australia and worked as a sub-editor at The Daily Mirror (Australia), The Townsville Bulletin and The Sunday Times (Western Australia). In 1987, Johnson again returned to London. He worked as a freelance sub-editor for the London Sun, News of the World and The Sunday Times before gaining employment as a staff sub-editor at the Daily Star.

In August 1989, Johnson returned to Nassau and in February 1990, began his own tabloid format newspaper titled The Punch; its office located on Farrington Road in Oakes Field.
In 1992, on the morning of election day, The Punch ran a headline predicting the Free National Movement win over Progressive Liberal Party by 32 seats to 17. The tabloid was hence called The Prophet Punch.

To his credit, Johnson is the first and only Bahamian to have played professional cricket at the first-class and junior Test cricket level.

Johnson is the son of the late Basil L. I. Johnson, CBE DFM RAFVR who was a World War II flight sergeant.  Johnson's father was the only black Bahamian to fly in the British Royal Air Force during World War II.


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Contact
To learn more, please contact:
Lindsay Thompson
Secretary
242-434-5643
For more about the Bahamas Press Club 2014, visit www.bahamaspressclub.org
Facebook: The Bahamas Press Club 2014